Finding beauty, creating harmony: The art of William F. Jackson

Editorial Staff Art

November 2009 | William Franklin Jackson was an artist who spent most of his career in an out-of-the-way city that was more concerned with politics and economic development than art. Sacramento, California, was little more than a frontier outpost when he arrived in 1863, although it was already the capital city of a state with almost unlimited potential for growth. …

Charles Melville Dewey: A forgotten master of classic tonalism

Editorial Staff Art

November 2009 | Of all the great disappearing acts in American art history, the tonalist artist Charles Melville Dewey’s is one of the most complete and inexplicable. Few artists of the period received more glowing notices from critics or were more widely admired in elite art circles, only to have left so little in the way of a footprint. Like …

This Week’s Top Lots: September 26 – October 2

Editorial Staff Art

* Skinner Boston/September 26, American Indian & Ethnographic ArtThe top lot was a tie between a 19th century carved Maori figure of a man (estimate $30,000-50,000) and a 19th century carved wood triple-blade gunstock club (estimate $25,000-35,000) that each sold for $35,500. Another top lot was a pre-Columbian carved limestone figure that sold for $29,625 (estimate $6,000-8,000). * Christie’s New …

Summer in the Adirondacks

Editorial Staff

A “Wild, Unsettled Country”: Early Reflections of the Adirondacks, which opened last week, includes a selection of paintings, maps, prints, and photographs that illustrate the untamed Adirondack wilderness discovered by artists, photographers, and cartographers who visited the area in the nineteenth century. While tourists were flocking to Saratoga Springs, near what is today the southern boundary of the Adirondack Park, …

American Indian painting

Editorial Staff

Between 1879 and 1900 the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs established twenty-four off-reservation boarding schools for American Indian children, among them the Santa Fe Indian School in New Mexico. The schools were intended as a means of absorbing American Indians into the larger society by transforming the children of what were considered savage warriors into fully “civilized citizens.” But …