Make Americana great again: The Wunsch family has a plan

jbitenc Furniture & Decorative Arts

Among aficionados of early American decorative arts, the name Wunsch is legendary. The family’s art and antiques collection—started by the canny and ever-curious engineer E. Martin Wunsch (1924–2013), and administered under the aegis of the Wunsch Americana Foundation—is one of the most important in the field.

The Schwarz Gallery

Gregory Cerio Art, Furniture & Decorative Arts

by Gregory Cerio The Private Office of George William Childs at the Philadelphia Public Ledger, Philadelphia by George Bacon Wood Jr. (1832–1910), 1877. Oil on canvas, 27 by 38 inches. Private collection; all photographs courtesy of the Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia.     Specializing in American and European paintings of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries and best known for its expertise in …

Dealer profile: Lawrence Steigrad and Peggy Stone

Editorial Staff Art

In 1989 Lawrence Steigrad and his wife and business partner, Peggy Stone, began dealing in Old Master paintings backed by only a thousand dollars and a few credit cards. For the first year, in case things didn’t work out, Stone continued to work as a cataloguer at William Doyle, returning home to help with research and catalogu­ing late into the …

Dealer Profile: Peter Tillou

Editorial Staff Art

Every so often a few wise things get said about the passions of people who are collectors (most famously in Walter Benjamin’s essay “Unpacking My Library”). Rarely is anything of interest written about dealers, and oddly enough, almost nothing can be found on the nature of that intriguing hybrid, the dealer/collector, which brings us to the pre-eminent example of the …

Vose Galleries at 170

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

By Tom Christopher   left to right: Elizabeth Vose Frey, Carey L. Vose, Abbot W. “Bill” Vose, Marcia L. Vose. Vose Galleries of Boston is that rarest of survivors: now completing its 170th year in business and still under the direction of the founding family, the firm itself predates many of the paintings that it buys and sells. Yet it …

Hirschl and Adler

Editorial Staff Art

“We’ve done something that hasn’t been done before,” Stuart P. Feld told me, rais­ing an eyebrow ever so slightly above the rim of his glasses, after the opening earlier this year of Hirschl and Adler’s exciting new gallery in the Crown Building, on the southwest corner of Fifth Avenue and Fifty-seventh Street in midtown Manhattan. And indeed, decorative and fine …

Dealer Profile: Erik and Cornelia Thomsen

Editorial Staff Art

Erik and Cornelia Thomsen One of a pair of six-panel screens, Japanese, Edo period, seventeenth century. Ink and color on gold-leafed paper, 65 by 133 inches. Photographs are by courtesy of Erik Thomsen Asian Art, New York. Suzuribako (writing box), Japanese, Meiji period, c. 1900. Black lacquer with maki-e decoration on wood; height 1 ½, length 8, width 7 ¼ …

Dealer Profile: David Lavender

Editorial Staff Art

One of the surprises of the huge Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé sale this past February was the splendid selection of objets de vertu the two men had gathered for their twentieth-century Kunstkammer. The way in which this assemblage contravened recent trends in collecting was on my mind as I waited to see the London dealer David Lavender, whose …