Jerry Bywaters at the Blanton Museum of Art

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Jerry Bywaters (1906-1989) was a seminal figure of 20th-century art in Texas. In addition to the prominent role he played as a faculty member for more than forty years at Southern Methodist University (SMU), and as director of the Dallas Museum of Art for over twenty years (1943-1964), throughout his career he was also an artist, curator, and critic. Considered …

In conversation with…Raymond D. White, artillery art collector

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In our current issue author Jane A. Kimball has written a survey of “Trench art of the Great War.” To complement this story, we asked artillery art expert and collector Raymond D. White to tell us more about this unique art.Tell us about your collection and how you got interested in trench/artillery art?There are currently 225 casings in my collection. …

Recommended this week

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On August 15 & 16 Northeast Auctions will host its annual Marine, China Trade & Sporting Art auction, including English pottery from the collection of Bob Treitelman. See all 1,152 lots here. Peggy Cooper Cafritz spoke to the New York Times about the loss of her African-American and African art collection after her Washington, DC home was destroyed by fire …

In conversation with…Rosemary Hill, Pugin biographer

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God’s Architect: Pugin and the Building of Romantic Britain by Rosemary Hill (Yale University Press, 2009), an extensive biography of Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812-1852), won the Wolfson Prize for History and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Biography in 2007, when it was published in England. The book is recently published in the U.S. by Yale University Press. …

Queries: American musical clocks

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The first musical clocks were invented in the Netherlands in the fourteenth century. Two hundred years later European royalty and aristocracy were commissioning them. At the palace of Versailles Marie Antoinette possessed a musical clock that played ten of her favorite tunes. (It was discovered at the palace in June 1914, two weeks before the start of World War I.) …

Collecting Zsolnay art pottery, a conversation with Dr. László Gyugyi

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Dr. László Gyugyi, a Hungarian-born retired research engineer now living in Pittsburgh, has assembled the finest private collection of Zsolnay art pottery, numbering nearly six hundred pieces. A portion of his collection is now on view at the Forbes Galleries in New York City, before it will be donated to a new cultural center being built in Pécs, Hungary, in …

Yeshiva University Museum Appoints Wisse as New Director

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Following the retirement of Sylvia A. Herskowitz, who served in the post for 33 years, Dr. Jacob Wisse has been appointed director of the Yeshiva University Museum in New York City, whose permanent collection includes more than 9,000 objects spanning over 3,000 years of Jewish history. A Montreal native, Wisse earned his B.A. from McGill University before going on to …

The ‘It’ chair

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January 2009 | Fashion and the public, both fickle, love the new, so it is curious that a chair designed some 250 years ago has suddenly become the “it” accessory in many trendsetting houses. Furnishings do nothave publicists or agents, but they do have shelter magazines. If you read any of them, chances are you have seen the so-called Frances …

The baptism of Pocahontas

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January 2009 | Lacking eyewitness accounts or written records, Chapman joined the ranks of historical painters and wove a few factual threads together to produce a finished tapestry of image and meaning. Since ancient times, people have learned the lessons of religion, philosophy, and history from the art in churches, temples, and public places. The government buildings in Washington repeat …