Site Source: Danish-furniture.com

Editorial Staff Exhibitions, Furniture & Decorative Arts, Magazine

Recent issues of The Magazine ANTIQUES have delved into the history and collecting of 20th-century design. The September 2008 article “The lost generation of Danish design” by Gregory Cerio is just one example. For readers interested in learning more about Denmark’s design masters the website Danish-furniture.com offers a fine introduction. The non-commercial website was launched by Dansk Møbelkunst, a Copenhagen-based gallery …

Maynard Parker’s modern architecture & interior photography

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

The Huntington Library recently launched a new online database that makes accessible the archives of Los Angeles-based architectural and garden photographer Maynard L. Parker (1901-1976). Parker contributed images to many of the nation’s premiere home design publications from the late 1930s through the early 1970s including House Beautiful, Architectural Digest, Better Homes & Gardens, and Sunset. He traveled across the …

This Week’s Top Lots: August 8 – 14

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

*  The top lot of the August 8 sale of the estate of Joseph Stanley at Rago in Lambertville, New Jersey was an 18th century slant front desk that sold for $42,700 (estimate $1,200-1,500). Other top lots were an English Chippendale-style sofa that sold for $18,300 (estimate $2,000-3,000), and a set of Regency parlor furniture that sold for $17,080 (estimate …

The Butterfly Man of New Orleans

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

May 2008 | The armoire is the most significant form of colonial French furniture made in the Americas.1 In Louisiana, armoires were crafted by immigrant cabinetmakers from the first quarter of the eighteenth century and were frequently listed in estate inventories from as early as the 1740s.2 Details of the construction and style of a group of twenty important Louisiana …

Servitude and Splendor: The craftsmen and carved furniture of the Rappahannock River valley, 1740 to 1780

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

May 2008 | By 1740 a colonial elite of well-to-do merchants and landowning planters had emerged in Virginia. With riches from tobacco production supplemented by investments in the profitable iron industry, they were fully prepared to engage artisans and to  commission houses and furniture in the latest European styles that would express and solidify their economic status. This trend was …

Sleeping beauties

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Beds recently offered at auction and antiques shows demonstrate a rich area of the decorative arts in which provenance and personal history is key. At the Bonhams New York sale of American furniture this past February, the top lot was a rare Herter Brothers bedstead that was made around 1872 for the master bedroom of Milton Slocum Latham’s Thurlow Lodge …

Maison Gerard at 35

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Dealers, decorators, and clients came out in full force last night to raise a glass in celebration of Maison Gerard’s thirty-fifth anniversary. Packed into the gallery’s East 10th Street showroom, well-wishers got an intimate look at the firm’s fine selection of art deco furniture—a marble-topped rosewood and burl cabinet by Louis Süe and André Mare, a macassar-ebony extension table taking …

A new setting for Iliad Antik

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Trumeau commode with drop-front desk and vitrine, Austria, c. 1820-25. Walnut veneer with gilded capitals, glass, and gilt bronze mounts; height 65 7/8, width 37 13/16, depth 20 11/16 inches. Secretaire by Eugene Praz, France, 1929. Palisander veneer with ebony and burled amboyna, fruitwood and brass inlay, brass; height 64 3/8, width 38 5/8, depth 17 11/16 inches. Credenza by …

Red, white, and Tiffany blue

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts, Magazine

The ambitious transformation of the White House by Jacqueline Kennedy (1929–1994), which began in 1961—from a hotel-like assemblage of department store reproductions to a living museum of fine American antiques—was so greatly admired that many people believed those interiors would be thenceforth immutable. But nothing at the White House is forever, as that first lady came to realize about her …

Preview of the Winterthur Ceramics Conference

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

For everyone who won’t be able to attend this year’s Winterthur ceramics conference, Coming to America: Imported Ceramics & the Wares They Inspired, here is a peek oat the works that will be featured-from Presidential porcelain to Staffordshire and saltglaze. Celebrating 300 years of earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain in America, the conference, which combines lectures and workshops, will be held …