Queries: Paper lined bed testers

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Cybèle Gontar and Stephen Harrison are writing an article on paper-lined bed testers. Decorative wallpapers have traditionally been placed on walls, ceilings, and folding screens. Less commonly, wallpapers were also used to cover valances and ceilings of bedsteads in the late eighteenth century. Bed and window valances covered with paper were advertised by Francis Delorme, a French immigrant craftsman in …

The Worsham-Rockefeller rooms

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

In New York in the 1880s—the gilded age when the likes of the Rockefellers, the Vanderbilts, and the Goulds were building their mansions along and near Fifth Avenue—the new aesthetic style often reigned supreme as the choice for their grand interiors. Herter Brothers, Kimbel and Cabus, Pottier and Stymus, Leon Marcotte are just a few of the firms that catered …

Endnotes: April’s fool

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Life with Cora Ginsburg was a perpetual trunk show. Six years after the dealer’s death in 2003, her protégée, Titi Halle, is still plumbing the depths of the inventory of rare costumes, textiles, and needlework she acquired when she purchased the Cora Ginsburg gallery in New York in 1997. One recent rediscovery is a man’s handsewn suit of heavy natural …

The Butterfly Man of New Orleans

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

May 2008 | The armoire is the most significant form of colonial French furniture made in the Americas.1 In Louisiana, armoires were crafted by immigrant cabinetmakers from the first quarter of the eighteenth century and were frequently listed in estate inventories from as early as the 1740s.2 Details of the construction and style of a group of twenty important Louisiana …

Servitude and Splendor: The craftsmen and carved furniture of the Rappahannock River valley, 1740 to 1780

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

May 2008 | By 1740 a colonial elite of well-to-do merchants and landowning planters had emerged in Virginia. With riches from tobacco production supplemented by investments in the profitable iron industry, they were fully prepared to engage artisans and to  commission houses and furniture in the latest European styles that would express and solidify their economic status. This trend was …

Sleeping beauties

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Beds recently offered at auction and antiques shows demonstrate a rich area of the decorative arts in which provenance and personal history is key. At the Bonhams New York sale of American furniture this past February, the top lot was a rare Herter Brothers bedstead that was made around 1872 for the master bedroom of Milton Slocum Latham’s Thurlow Lodge …

Maison Gerard at 35

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Dealers, decorators, and clients came out in full force last night to raise a glass in celebration of Maison Gerard’s thirty-fifth anniversary. Packed into the gallery’s East 10th Street showroom, well-wishers got an intimate look at the firm’s fine selection of art deco furniture—a marble-topped rosewood and burl cabinet by Louis Süe and André Mare, a macassar-ebony extension table taking …

A new setting for Iliad Antik

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

Trumeau commode with drop-front desk and vitrine, Austria, c. 1820-25. Walnut veneer with gilded capitals, glass, and gilt bronze mounts; height 65 7/8, width 37 13/16, depth 20 11/16 inches. Secretaire by Eugene Praz, France, 1929. Palisander veneer with ebony and burled amboyna, fruitwood and brass inlay, brass; height 64 3/8, width 38 5/8, depth 17 11/16 inches. Credenza by …

Time Flies: A daylight savings reminder

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

This 18th century cartel clock from the Horace Wood Brock collection, featured in the March issue of ANTIQUES, aptly depicts the fleeting nature of time, is particularly appropriate  this Sunday, when are clocks, now mostly digital, are turned ahead one hour. Brock’s stunning collection is a reminder of an age when instruments of timekeeping were not just practical necessities, as …

Endnotes: Boston needlework

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts

We were prepared to pay considerably more, so were happily surprised,” says American needlework dealer Carol Huber about her successful bid on this charming Boston canvas-work picture, offered at the first auction of American furniture and decorative arts held by Bonhams in New York in mid-January. When she saw it in the catalogue, she thought the presale estimate of $6,000 …